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Not Yet Dead: Meditations on Regeneration

Last night I started reading God is not Yet Dead by V. Gardavsky, a book I was introduced to within the pages of Run with the Horses by Eugene Peterson. Why is a book about a prophet, referencing a book written by an atheist, demanding my attention? It summarizes my 2017 experience, caught in the clash between two systems of thought and belief.

These books, and a bowl of shriveled beets on my kitchen counter, give me perspective.

shriveled beets regenerate life

In 2017, I suffered through the petty meme-induced, twitter-fed, mud brawl of culture that has become the dominant news-feed of American society, as did we all.  What is this landscape that we have created, where animosity and shaming the “other” have become mainstream on all fronts?

Why does my discovery of beet leaves in a bowl of decay give me hope? Because, like Gardavsky, I must look to an answer to the decayed civil landscape by ‘digging down to the roots.’ What looks ugly and wrinkled in a state of decomposition, like the uncivil state of Western Civilization, remains the source of life even so. Beet roots of latent, mold-covered energy are not yet dead; a mid-winter shimmer of burgundy and chartreuse life springs forth from it’s shriveled mass.

not yet dead beet

A resident pattern of regeneration testifies to Life. On this we can all agree.

How the pattern became resident has been the matter of debate since human-measured Time began. Was the pattern created or accidental? If created, then the hope of Life originates and remains in it’s created Source and all men are created equal, with blind-folded Justice consulting an absolute Morality outside ourselves, often called God. If accidental, then the hope of Life has evolved and our trust must be in the evolutionary system and Ourselves as its accidental, yet sagacious spawn. Justice is determined by ever evolving moral conduct as determined by genius-leaders at the top of the evolutionary matrix. These are the twin roots of our info-wars.

As an artist who mingles between these two camps in a cultural estuary of fresh water and salt, I must guard against becoming reactionary, and instead point to the pattern of regeneration found in each system. It is my job to help create a generative culture of green-leaved connection. This mandate I have gained by reading another book, Culture Care by Makuto Fujimora. More reflections on that later.

A resident pattern of regeneration testifies to Life. It is my job to help create this generative culture through my work.

What to draw when inspiration fails: January Daily Art

I’ve progressed through six weeks falling off the “daily art” wagon and climbing back on again, but I am now seeing that January’s effort at discipline in honing my craft is birthing that creative energy the dark days of December and January sapped. I added this motivational quote in my “Artist’s Daybook”

… the artisan understands that
when life is a work of art
when we value craft
when we embrace the elegance of workmanship
we experience the Divine.
— Edwin McManus The Artisan Soul

For inspiration, I turned to two art books that have been my constant craftsmanship companions throughout my career: The Artistic Anatomy of Trees by Rex Vicat Cole and Anatomy and Drawing by Victor Perard. The former was discovered in a college bookstore while I was studying studio art at Kent State. The latter came to me on recommendation of artist Judith Carducci, who shared during one of her figure painting workshops how she copied drawings from Cole’s book as a young girl. It certainly gave her a rock solid understanding of the bone and muscle structures underneath her portraits that make her colors and pastel work sing.

January was spent in efforts to copy something, anything from these books as the darkness all around me pretty much blanketed my imagination like wet snow over buried seed.

Lynda Rimke Daily Art copies of Perard and Cole

Lynda Rimke Daily Sketch Challenge copies of Victor Perard and Rex Vicat Cole & etc.

Now, in mid-February, I am feeling the energy of longer days, and am in a better place to act on what inspiration may come with more skill than before. But that will be the next blog post!

New Year’s Resolution #1

In 2017 I have resolved to make daily art. This means drawing a 15 minute to 1 hour sketch, and painting twice a week or more. These are my only new resolutions for 2017. In the past, I have told myself to do these things but somehow the ball gets dropped. Maybe some blog accountability with help?

Getting enough exercise and eating with moderation are resolutions that will continue, along with working responsibly, walking with God and being a kind-hearted human being. Simple enough … These are the foundational things that help the artisan soul and make my life into a work of art, which is what is most important.

Therefore, this morning, I used SketchTime on my smartphone to catch the dying blue spruce out my living room window.

Lynda Rimke daily art 2017

#dailysketchtime #dailysketch #dailyart